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Welcome

About Fertilis

Fertilis is pioneering micro-medical technology to automate IVF, focusing on improving embryo quality and quantity.

Fertility rates are falling globally, and sperm counts are halving every generation.

Approximately

1

in

6

globally, have experienced infertility at some stage in their lives.

About Fertilis

Fertilis’ micro-medical technology is an innovation more than 20 years in the making. Fertilis Co-Founder and Chief Scientific Officer Professor Jeremy Thompson developed the idea in the late 1990s.

In 2017, he collaborated with co-members of the Centre for Nanoscale Biophotonics to develop his micro-device design, which was created using a micron-3D printer and revised and tested in collaboration with Professor David Gardner’s team at the University of Melbourne.

Fertilis, established in 2019 by Prof. Jeremy Thompson, Prof. David Gardner, and Marty Gauvin, is based in Adelaide, Australia. Our primary goal is to develop medical devices that enhance the quality of embryos in IVF treatments.

Research

Publications

Published Papers

Fertilis has participated in the following research publications, and the findings from these studies are utilized to shape the development of its medical devices.

Fabrication on the microscale: a two-photon polymerized device for oocyte microinjection

Abstract

Purpose
Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) addresses male sub-fertility by injecting a spermatozoon into the oocyte. This challenging procedure requires the use of dual micromanipulators, with success influenced by inter-operator expertise. We hypothesized that minimizing oocyte handling during ICSI will simplify the procedure. To address this, we designed and fabricated a micrometer scale device that houses the oocyte and requires only one micromanipulator for microinjection.

Methods
The device consisted of 2 components, each of sub-cubic millimeter volume: a Pod and a Garage. These were fabricated using 2-photon polymerization. Toxicity was evaluated by culturing single-mouse presumptive zygotes (PZs) to the blastocyst stage within a Pod, with several Pods (and embryos) docked in a Garage. The development was compared to standard culture. The level of DNA damage/repair in resultant blastocysts was quantified (γH2A.X immunohistochemistry). To demonstrate the capability to carry out ICSI within the device, PZs were microinjected with 4-μm fluorescent microspheres and cultured to the blastocyst stage. Finally, the device was assessed for oocyte traceability and high-throughput microinjection capabilities and compared to standard microinjection practice using key parameters (pipette setup, holding then injecting oocytes).

Results
Compared to standard culture, embryo culture within Pods and a Garage showed no differences in development to the blastocyst stage or levels of DNA damage in resultant blastocysts. Furthermore, microinjection within our device removes the need for a holding pipette, improves traceability, and facilitates high-throughput microinjection.

Conclusion
This novel device could improve embryo production following ICSI by simplifying the procedure and thus decreasing inter-operator variability.

Yagoub, S.H., Thompson, J.G., Orth, A. et al. Fabrication on the microscale: a two-photon polymerized device for oocyte microinjection. J Assist Reprod Genet 39, 1503–1513 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-022-02485-1

This study was funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CE140100003) and the published results were based on mouse animal models.

A micro-fabricated device (microICSI) improves porcine blastocyst development and procedural efficiency for both porcine intracytoplasmic sperm injection and human microinjection

Abstract

Purpose

Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) imparts physical stress on the oolemma of the oocyte and remains among the most technically demanding skills to master, with success rates related to experience and expertise. ICSI is also time-consuming and requires workflow management in the laboratory. This study presents a device designed to reduce the pressure on the oocyte during injection and investigates if this improves embryo development in a porcine model. The impact of this device on laboratory workflow was also assessed.

Methods

Porcine oocytes were matured in vitro and injected with porcine sperm by conventional ICSI (C-ICSI) or with microICSI, an ICSI dish that supports up to 20 oocytes housed individually in microwells created through microfabrication. Data collected included set-up time, time to align the polar body, time to perform the injection, the number of hand adjustments between controllers, and degree of invagination at injection. Developmental parameters measured included cleavage and day 6 blastocyst rates. Blastocysts were differentially stained to assess cell numbers of the inner cell mass and trophectoderm. A pilot study with human donated MII oocytes injected with beads was also performed.

Results

A significant increase in porcine blastocyst rate for microICSI compared to C-ICSI was observed, while cleavage rates and blastocyst cell numbers were comparable between treatments. Procedural efficiency of microinjection was significantly improved with microICSI compared to C-ICSI in both species.

Conclusion

The microICSI device demonstrated significant developmental and procedural benefits for porcine ICSI. A pilot study suggests human ICSI should benefit equally.

McLennan, H.J., Heinrich, S.L., Inge, M.P. et al. A micro-fabricated device (microICSI) improves porcine blastocyst development and procedural efficiency for both porcine intracytoplasmic sperm injection and human microinjection. J Assist Reprod Genet (2024). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-023-03018-0

This study was funded by the Fertilis Pty. Ltd. through private investment and the published results were primarily based on porcine animal models with a human oocyte pilot study included.

Nano-liter perfusion microfluidic device made entirely by two-photon polymerization for dynamic cell culture with easy cell recovery

Abstract

Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has been the material of choice for microfluidic applications in cell biology for many years, with recent advances encompassing nano-scaffolds and surface modifications to enhance cell-surface interactions at nano-scale. However, PDMS has not previously been amenable to applications which require complex geometries in three dimensions for cell culture device fabrication in the absence of additional components. Further, PDMS microfluidic devices have limited capacity for cell retrieval following culture without severely compromising cell health. This study presents a designed and entirely 3D-printed microfluidic chip (8.8 mm × 8.2 mm × 3.6 mm) using two-photon polymerization (2PP). The ‘nest’ chip is composed of ten channels that deliver sub-microliter volume flowrates (to ~ 600 nL/min per channel) to 10 individual retrievable cell sample ‘cradles’ that interlock with the nest to create the microfluidic device. Computational fluid dynamics modelling predicted medium flow in the device, which was accurately validated by real-time microbead tracking. Functional capability of the device was assessed, and demonstrated the capability to deliver culture medium, dyes, and biological molecules to support cell growth, staining and cell phenotype changes, respectively. Therefore, 2PP 3D-printing provides the precision needed for nanoliter fluidic devices constructed from multiple interlocking parts for cell culture application.

McLennan, H.J., Blanch, A.J., Wallace, S.J. et al. Nano-liter perfusion microfluidic device made entirely by two-photon polymerization for dynamic cell culture with easy cell recovery. Sci Rep 13, 562 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-023-27660-x

This study and funded by Fertilis Pty Ltd and the published results were based on mouse animal models.

Vitrification within a nanoliter volume: oocyte and embryo cryopreservation within a 3D photopolymerized device

Abstract

Purpose
Vitrification permits long-term banking of oocytes and embryos. It is a technically challenging procedure requiring direct handling and movement of cells between potentially cytotoxic cryoprotectant solutions. Variation in adherence to timing, and ability to trace cells during the procedure, affects survival post-warming. We hypothesized that minimizing direct handling will simplify the procedure and improve traceability. To address this, we present a novel photopolymerized device that houses the sample during vitrification.

Methods
The fabricated device consisted of two components: the Pod and Garage. Single mouse oocytes or embryos were housed in a Pod, with multiple Pods docked into a Garage. The suitability of the device for cryogenic application was assessed by repeated vitrification and warming cycles. Oocytes or early blastocyst-stage embryos were vitrified either using standard practice or within Pods and a Garage and compared to non-vitrified control groups. Post-warming, we assessed survival rate, oocyte developmental potential (fertilization and subsequent development) and metabolism (autofluorescence).

Results
Vitrification within the device occurred within ~ 3 nL of cryoprotectant: this volume being ~ 1000-fold lower than standard vitrification. Compared to standard practice, vitrification and warming within our device showed no differences in viability, developmental competency, or metabolism for oocytes and embryos. The device housed the sample during processing, which improved traceability and minimized handling. Interestingly, vitrification-warming itself, altered oocyte and embryo metabolism.

Conclusion
The Pod and Garage system minimized the volume of cryoprotectant at vitrification—by ~ 1000-fold—improved traceability and reduced direct handling of the sample. This is a major step in simplifying the procedure.

Yagoub, S.H., Lim, M., Tan, T.C.Y. et al. Vitrification within a nanoliter volume: oocyte and embryo cryopreservation within a 3D photopolymerized device. J Assist Reprod Genet39, 1997–2014 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-022-02589-8

This study was funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CE140100003).

ESHRE 2023 Abstract

Abstract title:

Intracytoplasmic sperm injection conducted within a micro 3D printed device that requires no holding pipette or vacuum reduces porcine oocyte invagination during microinjection.

Authors:

J.G. Thompson1,2,3,4, M.P. Inge1, H.J. McLennan1, S.L. Heinrich1, A.J. Blanch1, S.J. Wallace5, M.B. Waite1, A.K. Love1, D.K. Gardner6,7

1Fertilis Pty Ltd, Frome Road, Helen Mayo South, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia
2School of Biomedicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia
3Robinson Research Institute, Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia
4ART Lab Solutions Pty Ltd, 10 Pulteney Street, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia
5Virtual Ark Pty Ltd, 73 Woolnough Road, Semaphore SA 5019 Australia
6Melbourne IVF, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 Australia
7School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010 Australia

Study question:

Can the use of a custom-designed and 3D printed microICSI™ device reduce the degree of oocyte invagination during intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)?

Summary answer:

Invagination was significantly less in porcine oocytes when ICSI was performed in microICSI™ device compared to conventional ICSI.

What is known already:

ICSI is a difficult procedure for embryologists to master, yet until recently, technically little had changed. In particular, the holding pipette (HP) with vacuum to hold the oocyte has not been surpassed. However, a source of shear-stress during ICSI of oocytes is the invagination of the zona pellucida and cytoplasm that occurs during microinjection, due to the pressure of the injection pipette against the small surface area of the HP. A recent study demonstrated microinjection within a two-piece 3D printed device. Here we evaluated a design refinement that displaced injection pressure more evenly across the oocyte to improve embryo quality.

Study design, size, duration:

A control (conventional ICSI) and study group (microICSI™) were compared over three replicates investigating the level of invagination (3-point score, 1 is lowest and 3 is greatest) during ICSI. Incidence of cytoplasmic lysis was also recorded 24 h following ICSI.

Participants/materials, setting, methods:

Porcine oocytes collected by follicle aspiration of abattoir-sourced ovaries were matured for 39-44 h in NCSU-23 medium supplemented with eCG, hCG, porcine follicular fluid, EGF and insulin. Mature oocytes, stripped of cumulus, were randomly allocated to either conventional ICSI or microICSI™. ICSI was performed, with treatment order randomised, and the injected oocytes were cultured in NCSU-23 culture medium at 39ºC.

Main results and the role of chance:

The microICSI™ device was modelled as a one-piece structure with contoured surfaces within a microwell array to support the oocyte during injection without the requirement for a holding pipette. Two-photon polymerisation 3D micro printing was used to print and assess multiple prototype geometries to optimise the support of the oocyte during ICSI. Over the three replicates (n= 10-20/treatment/replicate), the degree of invagination was consistently lower in the microICSI™ group compared with conventional ICSI (Mean ± SEM): Replicate 1: 1.40 ± 0.16 vs. 2.00 ± 0.19; Replicate 2: 1.20 ± 0.11 vs. 2.00 ± 0.13; Replicate 3: 1.42 ± 0.12 vs. 1.78 ± 0.15, with a paired t-test showing a significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.035). The incidence of lysis was not significantly different between the two treatments (ranging from 15-20% across both groups and varied between replicates).

Limitations, reasons for caution:

The use of a porcine ICSI model may not sufficiently replicate what occurs with human ICSI as human oocytes experience greater levels of invagination (typically scored out of 4 rather than 3).

Wider implications of the findings:

Reducing the invagination due to the injection process may reflect a less stressful procedure, with improvement to fertilization rates and embryo quality.

Demonstration of oocyte invagination during C-ICSI and microICSI™

This study was funded by Fertilis Pty Ltd and the results were based on porcine (pig) animal models.

FSANZ 2023 Abstract

Abstract title:

Improved Porcine Sequential Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Efficiency within a micro 3D Printed Device.

Authors:

Megan P. INGE1, Hanna J. MCLENNAN1, Shauna L. HEINRICH1, Adam J. BLANCH1, Samuel J. WALLACE2, Michael B. WAITE1, Allison K. LOVE1, David K. GARDNER3,4, Jeremy G. THOMPSON1,5,6,7

1 Fertilis Pty Ltd, Frome Road, Helen Mayo South, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia
2 Virtual Ark Pty Ltd, 73 Woolnough Road, Semaphore SA 5019 Australia
3 Melbourne IVF, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 Australia
4 School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010 Australia
5 School of Biomedicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia
6 Robinson Research Institute, Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia
7 ART Lab Solutions Pty Ltd, 10 Pulteney Street, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia

Background:

Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is a technically difficult and time-consuming procedure, with a risk of skipping or reinjecting oocytes due to poor traceability in media droplets.  Further refinement of a two-piece two photon polymerised support structure that removes the need for a holding pipette during ICSI into a numbered microwell array was designed to improve ICSI efficiency and standardisation.

Aim:

The aim of this study was to demonstrate how the microICSI™ device improves traceability of porcine oocytes during ICSI and makes conducting sequential ICSI more time efficient.

Method:

Abattoir derived porcine ovaries were aspirated to collect immature cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COCs).  COCs were cultured in NCSU-23 medium with eCG, hCG, porcine follicular fluid, EGF and insulin supplemented for 39-44 h.  Once mature, COCs were denuded and randomly allocated between two treatment groups: conventional ICSI (C-ICSI) or microICSI™.  The microICSI™ device enabled polar body orientation prior to sperm pickup.  Sequential ICSI was performed with three well separated porcine sperm loaded in the injection pipette to inject three separate oocytes.

Results:

Timing to conduct sequential ICSI was taken from the point three sperm were loaded into the injection pipette and injection of the first oocyte was ready to begin, with timing stopped at the completed injection of the third oocyte.  Data is presented in seconds as Mean ± SEM.  Sequential ICSI conducted in the microICSI™ device (74 ± 14) was two and a half times faster than conventional ICSI (183 ± 26), with significantly improved traceability of injected oocytes in the microICSI™ device.

Conclusion:

The microICSI™ device provides significant benefits to the ICSI procedure by improving the traceability of oocytes, reducing the time required for sequential injection.  This reduces oocyte stress and minimises the risk of skipping or reinjecting oocytes, thereby standardising the ICSI procedure.

This study was funded by Fertilis Pty Ltd and the results were based on porcine (pig) animal models.

ASPIRE 2023 Abstract

Abstract title:

A micro 3D printed device for intracytoplasmic sperm injection removes the requirement for a holding pipette and reduces complexity of the procedure.

Authors:

Megan P. INGE1, Hanna J. MCLENNAN1, Shauna L. HEINRICH1, Adam J. BLANCH1, Samuel J. WALLACE2, Michael B. WAITE1, Allison K. LOVE1, David K. GARDNER3,4, Jeremy G. THOMPSON1,5,6,7

1Fertilis Pty Ltd, Frome Road, Helen Mayo South, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia
2Virtual Ark Pty Ltd, 73 Woolnough Road, Semaphore SA 5019 Australia
3Melbourne IVF, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 Australia
4School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010 Australia
5School of Biomedicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia
6Robinson Research Institute, Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia
7ART Lab Solutions Pty Ltd, 10 Pulteney Street, Adelaide SA 5005 Australia

Background and Aims:

ICSI was performed conventionally (C-ICSI) and within the microICSI™ device on abattoir derived porcine denuded oocytes matured in vitro for 39-44 h in NCSU-23 medium containing eCG, hCG, porcine follicular fluid, EGF and insulin.  Timing data was captured by video recording for pipette setup and injection time per oocyte for two embryologists and compared between each technique.  Oocyte injection time was taken from when a sperm loaded injection pipette was in focus with the oocyte until the injection pipette was removed from the oocyte.

Method:

Abattoir derived porcine ovaries were aspirated to collect immature cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COCs).  COCs were cultured in NCSU-23 medium with eCG, hCG, porcine follicular fluid, EGF and insulin supplemented for 39-44 h.  Once mature, COCs were denuded and randomly allocated between two treatment groups: conventional ICSI (C-ICSI) or microICSI™.  The microICSI™ device enabled polar body orientation prior to sperm pickup.  Sequential ICSI was performed with three well separated porcine sperm loaded in the injection pipette to inject three separate oocytes.

Results:

Timing to conduct sequential ICSI was taken from the point three sperm were loaded into the injection pipette and injection of the first oocyte was ready to begin, with timing stopped at the completed injection of the third oocyte.  Data is presented in seconds as Mean ± SEM.  Sequential ICSI conducted in the microICSI™ device (74 ± 14) was two and a half times faster than conventional ICSI (183 ± 26), with significantly improved traceability of injected oocytes in the microICSI™ device.

Conclusion:

The microICSI™ device reduces pipette set-up time and the complexity of the ICSI procedure, reducing the time required for oocyte injection by half.

This study was funded by Fertilis Pty Ltd and the results were based on porcine (pig) animal models.

Team

Meet our team of experts

Co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer

Prof. Jeremy Thompson

Professor Jeremy Thompson is Co-Founder and Chief Scientific Officer at Fertilis. He invented the Fertilis devices after working in reproductive health for more than four decades.

Jeremy is an internationally recognised professor who has authored more than 200 journal articles. He has held leadership positions at the University’s Robinson Research Institute and the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale Biophotonics. From 1999 to 2004, he gained clinical experience serving as the director of IVF clinic Repromed.

He developed his commercialization experience through a ten-year partnership between The University of Adelaide, Cook Medical LLC, and Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium. He has initiated a previous start-up, ART Lab Solutions Pty Ltd., and he was the commercialisation champion within the Robinson Research Institute.

Jeremy is a Fellow of the Society for Reproductive Biology, and in 2016, he was awarded its highest honor, The Founders Lecture. He holds a PhD in Veterinary Anatomy (Reproduction) from the University of Queensland.

Co-Founder and Chair of Advisory Board

Prof. David Gardner, AM, FAA

Professor David Gardner is a globally recognised IVF pioneer with considerable commercial experience in human ART, having developed the most successful culture system for the human embryo (G1/G2) and commercialized this system with Vitrolife AB in the late 1990s.

He is a Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor at the School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, and has served as the Scientific Director of Melbourne IVF since 2017. David has made vast contributions to the field of reproductive biology, which were recognized in both his 2017 election into the Australian Academy of Science and his winning of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine’s highest honor, the Distinguished Researcher Award. In June 2022 he was named a Member of the Order of Australia for Service to Reproductive Medicine and Education.

He has authored more than 300 publications, and he continues to lead innovation in human IVF. As the Scientific Director of Melbourne IVF, he has run successful clinical trials in both embryo culture and the use of artificial intelligence in IVF.

David is a Fellow of the Society for Reproductive Biology and holds a PhD in Biological Sciences from the University of York, UK.

Co-founder and CEO

Marty Gauvin

Marty Gauvin is CEO & Co-Founder of Fertilis. A serial entrepreneur, Marty has previously founded eight start-ups– including medical assistance technology firm GCL Systems– which have collectively raised over $20M in private capital.

Since 2001, Marty has sat on the board of various government and private investment committees focused on increasing investment into the commercialization of Australian research, including the Investment Committee of Innovation and Science Australia which governs the venture capital sector in Australia and Young and Well CRC, Australia’s first Collaborative Research Centre exploring the role of technology in improving the mental health of young people.

Chief Product Engineering Officer

Allison Love

Allison Love is Chief Product Engineering Officer at Fertilis where she leads on all aspects of product development, including manufacturing establishment, market release and production. Having held a variety of technical and managerial roles, Allison joined Fertilis in 2021, bringing over 20 years of experience in product engineering and development, specializing in in-vitro diagnostics (IVD) and delivering medical devices to market.

Prior to joining Fertilis, Allison successfully developed and managed award-winning products throughout their lifecycle, from concept prototyping to market launch and manufacturing sustainment. As the director of product development at Genea Biomedx, she led the IVF portfolio’s product development and engineering functions. At Leica Biosystems, a global leader in cancer diagnostics, Allison was program manager for their premium tissue processing platform, leading new product development and manufacturing sustainment. Previously, she was project leader and senior mechanical engineer at the consulting group Invetech, where she worked with health and life science leaders to develop breakthrough solutions, from life-saving point of care devices to diagnostics automation.

Allison holds a Bachelor of Engineering (Mech), Hons 1 from Monash University, Melbourne.

Chief Operating Officer

Roger Yerramsetti

Roger Yerramsetti has more than 20 years of experience leading operational, innovation, and technology departments at ASX 100 companies, startups, and early-stage companies.

Roger has been working with Fertilis since 2019 when he began assessing and validating commercial opportunities, creating financial models, and proposing incremental prototype delivery to de-risk the business. He is a critical and creative thinker who solves business challenges by looking at them from multiple angles while staying close to the needs of the end user.

Head of Adelaide Science Team

Hanna McLennan

Hanna McLennan is leading the Adelaide-based embryological scientific discovery team.
Hanna completed a transdisciplinary project bridging across Reproductive Biology, Chemistry, and Physics as a PhD student of the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics.

With nine publications to her name, she is continuing her career with collaborations across disciplines within Fertilis to transition new discoveries to exciting applications within the IVF clinic.She holds a PhD in Medicine (Reproductive Biology) from the University of Adelaide.

Clinical Research Scientist

Megan Inge

Megan’s career spans more than 20 years as a clinical embryologist, scientific director, and laboratory quality officer. She has experience in seven high performing IVF laboratories and possesses excellent technical skills and international experience. She holds a Master of Clinical Embryology from Monash University.

At Fertilis, her skills and knowledge as a clinical research scientist are focused towards helping automate/simplify ICSI, IVF insemination techniques, and embryo culture.

Global Product Manager

Sophie Hegarty

Sophie has over a decade of commercialisation experience in the Medical Device industry. She has a long track record of successful product launches in domestic and global markets ranging from capital equipment to surgical implants and consumables. Her most recent roles include General Management, Sales & Marketing Management and Product Management.

Scientific Advisory Board

Meet our advisors

Made up of scientific experts from around the globe, the Scientific Advisory Board supports Fertilis, providing guidance on research and product development.

The board members are key opinion leaders in the field of IVF. They provide guidance on product development and offer advice about the need for new products and the entry of new products into different national markets. Board members also act as sentinels for other disruptive ideas that Fertilis could transform into innovative technologies.

Chair

Prof. David Gardner, AM, FAA

Professor David Gardner is a globally recognised IVF pioneer with considerable commercial experience in human ART, having developed the most successful culture system for the human embryo (G1/G2) and commercialized this system with Vitrolife AB in the late 1990s.

He is a Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor at the School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, and has served as the Scientific Director of Melbourne IVF since 2017. David has made vast contributions to the field of reproductive biology, which were recognized in both his 2017 election into the Australian Academy of Science and his winning of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine’s highest honor, the Distinguished Researcher Award. In June 2022 he was named a Member of the Order of Australia for Service to Reproductive Medicine and Education.

He has authored more than 300 publications, and he continues to lead innovation in human IVF. As the Scientific Director of Melbourne IVF, he has run successful clinical trials in both embryo culture and the use of artificial intelligence in IVF.

David is a Fellow of the Society for Reproductive Biology and holds a PhD in Biological Sciences from the University of York, UK.

Member

Dr. David Mortimer

Dr. David Mortimer is the president and co-owner of Oozoa Biomedical, an international consulting company providing total quality management-based services, including designing facilities, processing analysis and optimization, auditing, and operational financial planning, to reproductive technology clinics.
David has many years of experience in the design and establishment of ART laboratories around the world. He is well-known in the field of reproductive biology, having authored or co-authored over 150 scientific publications and given over 300 conference presentations.
Before becoming a full-time consultant, David held many positions in the field of reproductive biology, including a professorship and appointment as Scientific Director of the Infertility Programme in the Departments of Obstetrics & Gynaecology and Medical Physiology at the University of Calgary where his research group investigated human sperm pathophysiology He was also the Scientific Director of Sydney IVF where he was responsible for the development of assisted reproduction laboratory services throughout Australia and Southeast Asia. During this time, he developed new sequential IVF culture media and benchtop incubators, which provided Sydney IVF with the highest success rates in Australia and were commercialized as the Cook Culture System.
He holds a PhD from Edinburgh University.
Member

Professor Louise Hull

Professor Louise Hull has worked in fertility services for more than three decades. During this time, she has helped many couples conceive and promoted the development of improved fertility treatments through research and education. She is an associate professor at the University of Adelaide Robinson Research Institute and a clinical academic at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital in Adelaide. She also works in private practice.
After completing her PhD in Endometriosis at the University of Cambridge, Louise established and led the Endometriosis Group at the Robinson Research Institute. Her research focuses on the basic science of endometriosis, developing new diagnostics for endometriosis, and conducting Phase 3 and 4 pharmaceutical trials. She is an international ambassador for the World Endometriosis Society and a Medical Advisory Board member for Endometriosis Australia and EndoNZ. She is also the deputy clinical leader of the Fertility and Conception Theme at the Robinson Institute and has served as an associate editor for Human Reproduction.
Louise publishes widely, presents at international conferences, supervises PhD students, and teaches reproductive medicine to medical students, registrars, and fellows. She has received numerous grants, fellowships, and awards.
Member

Dr. Zsolt Nagy

Dr. Zsolt Peter Nagy is the Scientific and Laboratory Director at Reproductive Biology Associates. He is a leading global expert in ICSI and cryopreservation.
He began his career in assisted reproduction at the Department of Reproductive Medicine at Brussels University, working as a medical scientist on the team that first developed ICSI. He has also served as a Scientific Director at the European Hospital in Rome, Italy, and clinics in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Over the past three decades, Zsolt has been an invited speaker at medical and scientific conferences, and he has organized or chaired over 100 congresses, symposia, and workshops. He is an associate editor for Human Reproduction and Reproductive Biomedicine, and he has authored or co-authored more than 200 articles published in peer- reviewed medical and scientific journals. He is frequently invited to perform international consultations to help improve the efficiency of IVF clinics, including to set up several ICSI laboratories around the world.
Zolt’s team most recently contributed to significant improvements in oocyte cryopreservation using vitrification technology, which led to the establishment of the first highly efficient donor egg cryo-bank in the United States.
He holds a PhD in biomedical science from the Free University of Brussels.
Member

Dr. Thomas Ebner

Dr. Thomas Ebner is the executive board member of ESHRE. He previously served as the executive board member of ALPHA– Scientists in Reproductive Medicine. He is a certified senior clinical embryologist who has authored or co-authored more than 160 papers and book chapters. His research interests include non-invasive IVF selection processes, andrology, vitrification, culture media, and time-lapse imaging. He holds a PhD from the University of Salzburg.
Member

Professor Laura Rienzi

Professor Laura Rienzi is the Scientific Director of GeneraLife, an international reproductive medicine network. An embryologist with more than 30 years of experience, she has served as the director of four IVF Centers as well as the scientific director of the Embryology Laboratory of the Reproductive Medicine Center at the European Hospital in Rome, Italy. In 2008, she co-founded and served as the laboratory director of the GENERA centers, which are now part of the GeneraLife group and operate in five countries, carrying out 25,000 treatments a year.
Laura has held many academic positions and is currently an associate professor in the Department of Biomolecular Sciences at the University of Urbino. She has more than 200 publications including articles, reviews, and book chapters, and she has been invited as a speaker at more than 300 scientific events around the world.
Laura played a key role in the introduction of vitrification for oocyte and embryo freezing in Italy. She has twice won the prestigious Grant for Fertility Innovation, and she was chosen by the World Health Organization alongside other leading international reproductive health experts to author the WHO manual for guidelines on treating infertility.

Partnerships

Clinical Partners

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    Careers

    Interested in joining the Fertilis team?

    Working at Fertilis is more than a job. We believe in helping people help people, so we are developing micro-medical technology to automate IVF.  By focusing on improving embryo quality and quantity we want to help more people to start families.

    ​At Fertilis, we value quality, precision, integrity, embracing the “new,” and being human. We are always on the lookout for talented, creative people who want to join our team.

    We look for people who are:

    • Passionate about the work we do
    • Focused on results and take ownership for delivering outcomes
    • Great problem-solvers who pay attention to detail
    • Well organized with excellent time management, prioritization, and multitasking skills
    • Adaptable and good at managing uncertainty in a dynamic, fast-paced environment
    • Willing to travel domestically and internationally
    • Strong communicators and creative thinkers

    What we offer

    Flexibility

    Whether you’re in the office or one of our labs, we offer a variety of flexible working options so that you can obtain your desired balance between your work life and personal life. We understand that during certain phases of life, employees have different needs, and we offer them the freedom to organize work and family life differently depending on the stage that they’re in.

    We offer a mix of flexible hours as well as hybrid work arrangements. Some of our roles are entirely remote.

    Career

    We want to help you build a rewarding career. We get to know you, understand what excites you, and help you hone your individual career goals so that you continue to develop while enjoying your work. We’ll support you as you enhance your skills and knowledge to master your current role, provide opportunities for promotions, and consider transfer to new or different positions depending on your career goals.

    Culture

    Equality, diversity, and inclusion are important parts of our culture. Our people are valued, respected, and heard. We make sure that all of our employees know that they matter. We couldn’t do the work we do without them.

    Leave

    We offer 10 days of fully paid personal leave and 20 of recreational leave (pro-rate for part-time employees). Leave accumulates if not taken. After 10 years of service, leave increases at the rate of 1.3 weeks a year.

    Want to be part of something meaningful? See our current job opportunities below or express your interest directly by sending a cover letter and resume to careers@fertil.is